Skyfall

Is James Bond still relevant? That’s the very obvious subtext of the newest Bond film Skyfall. Methodology, age, changing nature of villainy, and the rise of technology all imply that James Bond is no longer needed. For the filmmakers, they care less about making a statement on secret agents and more on secret agent movies. Can a Bond film still make money? Given the box office of  the film in England, they need not worry.

I fell in love with James Bond films as a kid growing up in the Roger Moore era. His Bond was a little older (Moore was already 46 when he made his 1st Bond, 56 when he made his last) with a bit more camp, goofy secret gadgets, and ridiculous villains I loved it as a kid. Then I came across Ian Fleming’s novels and read every one of them. By then, the Bonds were available on VHS and I immersed myself in Sean Connery’s tougher and sexier Bond with more original Fleming stories. (And there was that one good movie with George Lazenby)

The Timothy Dalton and Pierce Brosnan eras did little for me. I was thrilled that reboot came with Daniel Craig and Casino Royale. The movie was really good, but not the best. But I thought Craig’s portrayal was the truest to the Fleming novels. The follow-up didn’t do much for me and has the worst name of any Bond film. At least Octopussy let us say something dirty without getting in trouble. Quantum of Solace was just someone showing off dictionary skills (even if Fleming originated it).

Continue reading

Advertisements

Argo – No Spoilers

One of the joys of the movies is ignorance. Sometimes the less you know the better off you are. So this is a spoiler free (I hope) review of Argo. I won’t even use one of the great lines of the film that fits well into a blog just out of consideration for you.

Here’s 7 things to know (since there are 7 key people in…oh I say too much):

1. It’s based on a true story. But stop learning about the story and go in with a little knowledge as possible.

2. The 70s were full of drinking, chain smoking, ugly cars, big lapels, poor means of reaching people by phone, and grainy footage – all wonderfully recreated for the film.

3. Ben Affleck is not a stupendous director. But he makes eminently watchable, enjoyable, and tense films (Gone Baby Gone, The Town, and this).

4. This was the best film I have seen so far in 2012 and is a lock for a Best Picture nomination. It might even win.

5. Alan Arkin is ridiculously great in this.

6. John Goodman and Bryan Cranston are pretty excellent too. But not Arkin-good.

7. The film is tense ALL THE TIME.

Go see it. It is fun, enjoyable, dramatic, original, and well-worth it. Plus there is a deluge of seemingly great films coming. Get a jump on it and go see Argo ahead of the rest.

The Master

What to make of The Master? I had been so looking forward to this (NOT) based Scientology (well, sort of) drama from a great director and some of the best actors in the game. Here’s what I walked away with:

Paul Thomas Anderson is a challenging director. He doesn’t take an easy path to his films, pushes you as a viewer, gets incredible performances out of everyone, and has no desire to make anything comfortable or ordinary.

The film has a compact story. Very little happens – and what happens isn’t of much substance. This isn’t a movie to find out how it ends. It essentially comes to a conclusion of little surprise and then the credits roll. Paul Thomas Anderson films dn’t typically stick to standard film arc or character development. If it wasn’t for the acting in some of these dialogue driven scenes, the film could easily have lost me. Film will surely be nominated for the Oscar in Picture, Writing, and Director. But The Master isn’t a masterpiece. It is about its parts. And the acting is chief among them.

Continue reading

#BlogElul via the Movies – Movie List Wrap-Up

Although Elul is history, the baseball stat kid in me was curious about all the different movies I used in the 29 #BlogElul via the Movies posts.

Whether in passing or extended discussion, I referred to 87 different movies. No movie was mentioned more than twice – although 9 did get a double dose.

The oldest movie was The Passion of Joan of Arc (1928). The most recent was The Hobbit which comes out December 14, 2012. I tried to use more familiar and more recent films a a general rule.

To my surprise, I used only 1 Godfather movie – and it was Part III. I found a way to use all six Rocky movies including the first two twice.

I only used Indiana Jones and the Kingdom the Crystal Skull (in a disaparaging manner) and none of the other Raiders films (Want to buy this blogger a gift? The trilogy + the bad 4 th one just came out on Blu-Ray)

Not counting Dredd and The Hobbit, which haven’t been released, I have not seen only one of the films I used (Guesses?)

Best film I used: The Princess Bride

Worst film I used: Patch Adams (but Rocky V is close)

What’s the best film on this list in your opinion?

What’s the worst film on the list?

Here’s the full list:

Continue reading

#BlogElul via the Movies 28 – Responsibility

“With great power comes great responsibility.” – Uncle Ben (Click for video)

When the topic is “responsibility” and the vehicle is “movies,” this is the inevitable outcome. Uncle Ben cautions his nephew Peter with this famous phrase without even knowing the incredible burden or power that secretly Peter struggles with. Then Uncle Ben is killed as a direct result of Peter’s inaction and apathy. And thus Spider-Man is born.

The meta-source of the quote is unknown although some speculate where Stan Lee might have have been influenced.  But for Jews, we recognize that we all have great power. While Spidey-Sense and super strength are one kind of power, the influence we hold over others, the example we set, the opportunity to do mitzvot, and the power we hold over own selves are all tremendous responsibilities.

The High Holy Days are a time to reflect on that innate power and do something with it. Hopefully our inaction, apathy, or poor choices will not result in someone’s death. But it will result in our own soul being trapped from blossoming and thriving.

You have great power. Now use it to make a difference in your life and others.

#BlogElul is the brainchild of @imabima who blogs at imabima.blogspot.com. For the 30 days of Elul, the spiritual preparation before the Jewish High Holy Days, many Jews will be reflecting on the themes of the season. My posts will all be through the lens of movies. You can see all the themes in the graphic. Follow all the other excellent postings through Twitter at #BlogElul along with related items #Elulgram and #PopCultureElul.

#BlogElul via the Movies 27 – Good vs. Evil

It’s never as easy as “Good” vs. “Evil”. Cable news and the movies (and even the Bible) often want you to divide the world that way. From our individual perspective, it sure sometimes looks like that. But good and evil are much broader and deeper concepts than most of us think.

The Horror Movie portrays Evil as particularly simple – a soulless killing machine that deserve to be destroyed (usually multiple times in the same movie). One of the best takes on both horror movies and the nature of hero/villainy is the recent original comedy Tucker and Dale vs. Evil. The plot is that of any horror film: Young adults go into the woods only encounter two creepy hillbillies and the death that follows. But that isn’t this film at all as it is told from the perspective of those two country boys, Tucker and Dale. It is brilliant, funny, original, and will perhaps make you reevaluate evil from other films. (See the 1st #BlogElul entry discussing Darth Vader, for example).

I think this becomes personally important at the High Holy Days. The liturgy of services can lead you to villify yourself. But you are much more than the sum of your failings. There is no need to try and improve yourself if you are simple “Evil”. So don’t spend time on broad labels, but on positive possibilities for growth. Make this year less about being good than doing good. And the rest will follow.

#BlogElul is the brainchild of @imabima who blogs at imabima.blogspot.com. For the 30 days of Elul, the spiritual preparation before the Jewish High Holy Days, many Jews will be reflecting on the themes of the season. My posts will all be through the lens of movies. You can see all the themes in the graphic. Follow all the other excellent postings through Twitter at #BlogElul along with related items #Elulgram and #PopCultureElul.

#BlogElul via the Movies 26 – Readiness

I’m not ready. Then again, I am never ready right before the Holidays. I always do things in big bunches as we get closer. Most of the time it works, but it does make for a very stressful couple weeks before the High Holy Days. The muse of writing strikes when it wants. Unfortunately, it doesn’t always hit me when I have to get some sermonizing done. But you need to be in the right moment to be ready.

Look at When Harry Met Sally. Although both Harry and Sally were searching for relationships of different sorts and kept running into each other at moments they were available, it wasn’t until that New Year’s Eve at the end of the film that presented the moment. It was only then Harry found the courage, the words, the emotion, the recognition that they were to perfect to be together.

Or as Harry says, “I came here tonight because when you realize you want to spend the rest of your life with somebody, you want the rest of your life to start as soon as possible.”

The moment has to strike and then we are ready.

Continue reading